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Empowering global communities with Emma Woodcock from Grace & Able

Empowering global communities with Emma Woodcock from Grace & Able

This week at Aquamarine we are so humbled to talk to the inspirational Emma Woodcock from Grace & Able about building her ethical jewellery business and the importance of empowering others as a business owner.

Emma tells us a bit about her backstory, about taking the leap into launching Grace & Able, and all about her incredible journey working with artisans in Kenya and Uganda. Emma offers a truly unique and special perspective that we feel so privileged to be a small part of.

Take a peek into the greater story behind Grace & Able's beautiful jewellery and how Emma pays it forward with knowledge in business and community development!

Watch the video interview

Listen to the Audio:

Read the full transcript (click here)

Alison Rentoul:
Hi everybody and welcome to Aquamarine. We are being joined today by the lovely Emma Woodcock from Grace & Able. Hi Emma.

Emma Woodcock:
Hi, hi.

Alison Rentoul:
So Emma is an amazing, amazing person. She has an incredible business backstory of all these wonderful things that she did before she founded Grace & Able, and I'm gonna get her to tell us a little bit about that. But then she has gone on to found this absolutely beautiful fair trade jewellery business, and we've got in stock some of her gorgeous collection at Aquamarine. I'm even wearing one of her necklaces today, this is the necklace.

Emma Woodcock:
That's lovely.

Alison Rentoul:
It's very chic and very classical. So Emma, just wow, you're such an inspiration. What are you doing here and tell everybody a little bit about your background and how you came to found Grace & Able.

Emma Woodcock:
Sure. So I'm trying to make a long story quite short. And in that shell, I was born in New Zealand, but we were brought up in the Philippines, where my father was working in micro finance for many years, and he still, in fact, does. And so I think I always had that awareness in my upbringing, I didn't come to Australia until I was 12 years old, so a lot of my, kinda mental, formative years, where at a developing country, which as a teenager I thought was a real curse. I couldn't relate, I didn't watch TV for 12 years, so I couldn't relate culturally.

Alison Rentoul:
Oh my goodness, yeah.

Emma Woodcock:
As an adult, I see it as a real blessing. And then as a young person, you know, when you're 21, kind of finishing uni, not sure what you wanna do, I headed off to England, like all backpackers around here do. And I met my husband and married him and lived in England for nearly eight years. And it was during this time I came across some decorative Christmas decorations that were made in the Philippines and I was really excited to see something of my past. So I started trying to find out more about it. First off, I became annoyed with the shop, she didn't know her product line, she hadn't even known where she bought it from.

Alison Rentoul:
Wow.

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah, I know.

Alison Rentoul:
So many people are so disconnected from the source, the production line as you say, and have absolutely no idea, past, well, “I bought them from the wholesaler”, but they don't think beyond that.

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah.

Alison Rentoul:
I think it's changing, but it's still definitely a lot like that.

Emma Woodcock:
I do, and I think that's on a general business level, if you're selling something, you need to know that product. Even if you're not ethically minded or passionate about sale wages, or whatever, that's not necessarily an issue, but just to know your business, to be able to sell your product, you have to have product knowledge.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah.

Emma Woodcock:
Just from a customer service point of view, I was pretty amazed. And so I started tracking it down and traced it back to one of the tribal villages that my father had worked with.

Alison Rentoul:
Wow.

Emma Woodcock:
I played in those streets and with their children. And it broke my heart, because the more I traced it, the worse I realised what the wages on the production line were. So I knew that these were families that I had mixed with, that would not see what I was seeing, or would not see what the shop owner was seeing, profit-wise from that.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah.

Emma Woodcock:
At that time I was working as an interior designer and I had my own interior design firm. And I was just doing, that's the thing, and it became such a burning issue within me, that it formed the seed of Grace & Able about 14 years ago, so yeah. It's been a long time.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah. And so how long did it take for that burning seed to become such a big fire that you just had to do something about it?

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah, so I've been running Grace & Able for four years. So in that 10 years, between, like it really was planted in my soul, to becoming reality four years ago. I had a lot of different things… I had two children, I brought my family and my husband… I brought my husband… He chose, we work together. And we came back and decided to live in Australia, and so there was that big cultural shift, and people don't think it's cultural because we're the same skin colour and things like that, but there are a lot of little things to adjust to, that are quite different.

And so we did all that, and it was after my second child was probably coming up to his second birthday, but then I thought, no, this is time, I can't ignore it anymore. I was really scared because even though I had done my interior design business and also have been working as a visual merchandiser, freelancing, just a little boutique, doing visual merchandising, I still didn't have a great deal of business knowledge. You know, you can listen to the doubt and get really caught up in thinking that you're not enough. And I didn't even know where to begin with it. So it was very daunting, but I took a step… I took a giant leap, it felt like for me, and this is the result. Grace & Able is here for four years, slowly just building it up into something steady and sustainable.

Alison Rentoul:
That is fantastic. So I mean, how did you actually go about starting it, because it's quite… And tell everybody a little bit more about Grace & Able and what you're doing.

Emma Woodcock:
Sure. Okay, so yeah, it's probably important to say that Grace & Able is an accessory brand, that we are actually producing. I work directly with the artisans, I design the jewellery here and collaboratively with the artisans. And then, so there's no one else making the jewellery, although it's designed, it's quite unique. And I use the traditional skills that they have been passing down through generations, and we bring them into a contemporary result. So like the necklace you're wearing is actually made out of paper beads. And they print the colour that we're choosing for each collection onto recycled magazine paper.

Alison Rentoul:
Really, that's so cool.

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah, yeah. And then they roll it up by hand, and then they dry it and varnished it. So the whole process to make a necklace like yours is quite time consuming, because the varnishing and drying takes three days itself, and then they have to break that up, before they even weave the different designs of jewellery, from necklaces to earrings to bracelets. But it's all completely handmade, so every part of the process, from the rolling of the beads, to the checking of the varnish, to the tying on the clasps at the end, it was all completely done by hand and by artisans in Uganda and Kenya.

Now, Kenya doesn't do the paper beads, Kenya does the brass jewellery that we stock, and the brass jewellery again is a sustainable jewellery, where we get resources through another independent business, broken padlocks, broken tech ware, broken brass pieces, and then the artisans in Kenya melt that down into casting shapes onto brass sheets, and we make the jewellery from there.

Alison Rentoul:
Wow. Are you wearing some of those earrings?

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah, I'm wearing something from the new collection that launched last Thursday, they're anchors. And also there's also, just trialing some rings now, so…

Alison Rentoul:
Oh, cool.

Emma Woodcock:
So that's what I love about it. I love being able to work on the grass roots level. And why the artisans are doing all that, I work with different organisations and myself, and we go in and we provide them development training from literacy and numeracy skills, to health and wellbeing projects, to other income projects and also financial management. So the whole thing is a real holistic way to create power out of poverty.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah. Because you're actually working directly with them on creating a sustainable business, not only sustainable in terms of using sustainable materials like recycling and all the rest, but you're teaching them how to sustain their own communities and families.

Emma Woodcock:
That's right.

Alison Rentoul:
So they're creating, I just think it's such a wonderful, completely close to my heart, what you're doing.

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah, it's very, like I guess, the impact of the Philippines really never left me, and I'm quite passionate about social justice, and quite aware that my privilege only comes from where I was born, and I could've easily been born to a different family, and so I feel very passionate about using my privilege to pay it forward. And yeah, I encourage that to the artisans, I encourage them to do projects that… I pay them for it as well, so it's a very community thing as well, so.

Alison Rentoul:
Oh, that's so cool. So they're also seeing themselves as being in a position to be able to help others too, which is wonderful, because I'm sure a few years ago, before they started working with Grace & Able, they may not have seen themselves that way at all.

Emma Woodcock:
No, and I mean we're talking about real, below poverty line people here. One of the things we're doing is working on improving their living standard. So eventually, concreting their floors for a start, but many of them don't like just renting their home, so you have to go through, talk, networking and talking to the home owner about concreting floor, so everything takes a long time in Africa to get it done.

Alison Rentoul:
Yes.

Emma Woodcock:
You can't just go, “This is a great idea, I'm gonna do it”. You have to go through the proper customs and proper respect. So yeah, so we're looking at improving their lifestyle quality, but then making them aware that they're change makers as well, and that they can bring that into their community, they can pay it forward, they can look after people. It's important to state that my artisans are not my employees. They are their own independent business. I think that's really important, because it means they're empowering themselves, they're still not relying on a white person to bail them out.

And so when they run their own business, I come alongside very much as a partner, on an equal level. And I think part of the problem with poverty is that they see themselves as lesser, and they don't see equality with our country, or even what we have, we have plenty and they don't. So there's a real level of equality going on, so I try and work in a way that makes… I'm just pointing out that I'm exactly the same, we're in this together.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah, I love that, you know, the fact that you're empowering them to really see that, well, through this engine if you like of the business, that they can begin to gather their own momentum and drive their own situation forward and up, and out, obviously, which is just wonderful. So how did you actually go about finding these people to work with, was that a particularly time consuming journey, did you just kind of go randomly traveling around and found people, or?

Emma Woodcock:
No, no. It took a lot of prayer, because as a mom of two young children, I don't have a lot of time to just do the beautiful traveling around the world as much as my heart yearns for it at the time. And so, no, what happened was I have a very dear friend, mentor, just an inspirational woman, who is a CEO of a charity out there, that is actually an orphanage, well was Ian orphanage. UN around the world, started changing orphanages a couple of years back, because of such systemic abuse in orphanages, and she started working closely to lead the change into working with social workers to sign the next of kin.

Because many of the children in orphanages are not orphaned at all. And so she changed her charity from being an orphanage into a vocational training centre. And one of the problems she had was she couldn’t… All the stuff when she had she had an orphanage, then couldn't have places with her to continue being employed with her. And so I started talking to her about my dream of running a business, that everything was connected, you knew where it came from, you knew your production line, you knew the person behind your product.

And she said, well I do have this one woman in Uganda that I have to let go, but my heart, I just love her as a person, and my heart's really for her, and I don't know what will happen if I let her go. She works with all the single mothers in her ability to make jewellery, but they just make this jewellery, and then it sort of sits here and they don't get to sell it, or it goes to markets. But if you go to a market in Uganda, there's a lot of women selling jewellery.

So she's saying can you come out in two weeks, and we'll see what you can do. So I went out and stayed with her at the orphanage, and saw what she did and how she worked, which became really instrumental into respecting the culture and just learning how to do things with a great deal of respect in another country. Not bulldozing your way in because you think your way is the best. So it was all sorts of humbling to watch her work, and just a huge learning curve.

And it, what was that, I spent two weeks with Winnie, my manager out there, getting to know her, and then at the end of it, I came home and set up Grace & Able, and said, there's gotta be more, than me just advising her how to sell at a market, or to reach the boutique shops at the resort, on the river Nile kind of thing. I said there's gotta be more for her. So Grace & Able was founded out of that. Realising that I can bring power to the Australian consumer. You know, that we can make our… I just think that we work so hard to earn our money, we should also, once we spend it, you'll make it work hard.

Alison Rentoul:
Yes. It gives me goosebumps. It actually just makes me cry.

Emma Woodcock:
Thank you, yeah I've cried a lot in the past four years. Over big things, I mean they’re..

Alison Rentoul:
True. It's so true. Just because money, it's just energy, isn't it, and if we direct it like the water of a river, a great river. If we can direct it in such a way that it brings good to everybody that it touches all the way down the line. And what a wonderful world we would have.

Emma Woodcock:
I know right, and they say money is powerful, well let's make it be properly powerful, let's not make it just be the greedy or the corporate. Not that I have a problem with them, they are there for a reason, and we can learn a lot from them, but all things can be done with integrity, I believe, so.

Alison Rentoul:
Yes, absolutely, and money can be powerful, but let's use it to empower the people who are not in power. And you know, powerless in our society.

Emma Woodcock:
Yes. Yeah.

Alison Rentoul:
So that was the African side of things, what about the Philippines?

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah, so the Philippines is still in development. It's a lot harder, because there's a lot more competition with, they've got more access, so they've got internet, but they've got a huge history of having America there, so they often look to America before they look to Australia for solutions. And America approaches business quite different than Australians do. So it's a bit harder in some ways to get going. And I've come up, again, it's problems time and time again. So one example is, I'm networking with a group of women to get going at the moment and they want computers to manage their business. And I'm like, “Great, we will put that into your program, going forward that can be a goal. And the partnership of your business, you'll be able to get computers out of that, and then you'll have earned them, and it'll be a real success, and it's gonna taste so sweet for you, because you will have run the business to get there”.

And then they're also in talks with Americans who are like, “Yeah, no problem, we'll ship the computers to you”. So it's kind of like, oh, I'm gonna lose because I'm trying to get them to do it for themselves, or talking about micro financing lines for them, to get the computers. So there's some level of accountability. There's a lot of different things that go on, but we're still in talks with the Philippines and just seeing what's going on there. Yeah, my father is very much involved in this micro financing, in the food industry. So although we're very similar in a lot of our philosophies and what we do, we actually don't work together because we're very parallel.

Alison Rentoul:
Right.

Emma Woodcock:
He keeps telling me to get into the food industry, and I'm like, “One retail battle at a time”.

Alison Rentoul:
And so obviously you're a wholesaler, and that was how I found you, because I actually found you at the Reed Gift Fair, was that in January or February this year?

Emma Woodcock:
February, yeah, yeah.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah, and just, I was so excited to find you, I was like oh my god. And in fact, I stopped first because of the beautiful jewellery, and then when I found out the story behind it, I was blown away.

Emma Woodcock:
Yes, I remember meeting you there. That was actually the launch of wholesale, so up until February I had just been directing customer online and through a workshop. I was aware that I wanted to create Grace & Able into a wider reaching brand, and bring that, what I turn powerful practices to the consumer, throughout Australia, and there's only so much reach you can have through workshops, that's through online. And the online eCommerce is so competitive, it's very hard to get going there. But so, I saw some advice, and we felt that Grace & Able would work really well for wholesale, just in terms that each piece comes with a tag of the artisan and a little bio, so you're really connecting the story. And it's that human interest that is really well, it stands out on the shelves and things like that.

So yes, I launched in February, but that was a whole learning curve doing a trading show. And I realise now, my philosophy was very different, I didn't make my store look like a shop, like many of the other people did. I had it looking like an art gallery, it was so different. But I don't regret anything, it was a great learning curve, and hopefully next year I'll be able to do another trade show or two. But yeah.

Alison Rentoul:
Well, you certainly caught out attention. So you know, you weren't doing anything wrong as far as I could tell.

Emma Woodcock:
No, exactly, and I think that's been part of the learning curve, it's to realise that you're not for everyone, and that you will speak to who you need to, and to really stay true to that core of who your customer is, and not worry about it. Because it's so overwhelming when you're getting, anything even online, or even when you start looking at your competitors, who might actually have a slightly different customer target than you. You can easily get caught up, and like, oh I'm not doing enough, or whatever. But you really gotta come back to that core and the right people will find you, and that's what happened. Even if it's a slower business journey. When you realise why you're doing what you're doing, it's better to have that slower journey, because it's more authentic.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah, and when you really find your tribe.

Emma Woodcock:
Yes, your tribe.

Alison Rentoul:
The people who are deeply passionate supporters who are gonna really come and help to push it out.

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah, exactly.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah. So do you have stockists in Australia only, or are you looking to stock in the UK?

Emma Woodcock:
Yes, no, I'm very open to international stockists. I'm in talks with a couple of places in New Zealand at the moment. I'm in Tasmania, I'm in South Australia and I'm in Victoria obviously, trying to get into all states, so all inquiries are welcome. But yeah, I'm definitely interested to reaching into the UK, it's like a second home for me, and I think there's a place there for Grace & Able. But yeah, just trying to take it a step at a time, because whenever I scale up, I have to be mindful I have to scale my artisans up.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah.

Emma Woodcock:
It would be really easy to rush forward and scale up Grace & Able here, it might be overwhelming to my artisans. It's like a two step dance all the way.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah, yes, oh gosh, because that's the whole thing, it's artisans produced, not mass produced, so you gotta be able to keep up with the production demand. So it's quite an important part of the whole process.

Emma Woodcock:
It is. An important part of them learning their business journey as well, about scalability and what that means and how that grows them.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah. And so do you actually go out there and coach them, don't you, and hold workshops with them about not just about business, but about other things like feminine hygiene and things like that?

Emma Woodcock:
That's true.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah, tell us more about that.

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah, so I try to go out once a year, and then in the in-between time, I work with different organisations that are like-minded, that can do a lot of training and reach to the artisans if I can't do. But over international women's day, mother's day this year, we were able to do a starting of the women's health and wellbeing project. And then we were able to give them some washable sanitary kits, which sounds like oh that's not a big deal, but if you, I sat down and I was talking with my manager, and I said, what are your needs, what's going on, where can we make some improvements in your lifestyle, and she said, “Well, we're losing the women artisans”. Because I do work with men as well, it's not fully women. But we're losing the women artisans for about four or five days a month.

And then when you look at that over a year, well that affects the production they're able to give me and the brand here, but it also affects their income and their livelihood. So I started talking to her and said how do you manage it, and the stories that were coming back were so horrific. They were using not just dirty old rags, but more than that, some of them were actually using cow patties.

And so it was heartbreaking for me to hear that, I just couldn't imagine, and I thought, we instinctually sort of know that the hygiene about that is just really bad, but they don't, they are just so desperate and so oppressed, that they weren't even aware that that would be damaging to their health.

Alison Rentoul:
Oh my god.

Emma Woodcock:
And they could be picking up stuff. I realised it was just more than just giving them a kit and this is what you'll use, but it was also about teaching them how to manage it, how to stay clean, and all that sort of stuff. And so I put my manager Winnie through some training, and then she was able to teach the women, when she introduced the kit. So she was not only able to teach them how to wash it and keep it hygienic, but also for them, how to manage it in-between, and just how to keep cleanliness going, and just be hygienic. Not saying that they're not, but they have limited access to water, and things like that, so it was just about, you know, overall. This is damaging to your health, this is how you'd live.

And then about two weeks after that, we all also got a hold of some women's health booklets, printed in the local language, we even got comics, done out for the teenage girls. And so Winnie went to the community and got all their daughters and the young girls in the village, and was able to bring the same training to these girls that are going into starting puberty and things like that, so.

Alison Rentoul:
That's just so beautiful, I mean, gosh, what a life changing thing to give, to be able to give them. And you know, just so much that we take for granted here, and just don't even realise.

Emma Woodcock:
I know.

Alison Rentoul:
We're so naïve and thinking that in this day and age, well, everybody must have access to women hygiene products and know what to do with them, but no, I mean, still half the world doesn't.

Emma Woodcock:
About half, yeah. And it's not to say they don't, they can go to the nearby town which has the shops and buy it, but it's so out of their price range for them to consider buying it. And then it's got, it's like, well if I buy this, that means my children go without, or we go without meals for fours nights, or… You know, so the cost of it goes down to they'd rather feed their children and look after their families and themselves.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah, not many mothers do. So many mothers, I mean even in our culture, mothers are terrible for putting themselves last and putting everybody else first.

Emma Woodcock:
Exactly, exactly, I mean I do it. I might see something I like, or wanna shop, or need new shoes. But if the kids need new shoes before I do, I do it. And the only difference is I know, there's not a long wait until I can then sort myself out. For them it might not come around again.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah.

Emma Woodcock:
It was a very humbling project, very amazing to be part of it, but… Yeah, really important that it came from my artisans too. Like, I was really happy, because they will talk with me going out, and doing the trainings, but I really wanted it to be from my artisans to my artisans in the community.

Alison Rentoul:
Yes.

Emma Woodcock:
So yeah, I was just able to sort of watch on the bylines, and just being really humbled by the whole process, so.

Alison Rentoul:
Oh, how fantastic.

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah. I mean, someone said to me the other day, how do you define success? And I'm like, well that's it. That's it, when you can do those things, it's not so much about whether I'm in the red or in the black, or if my bank… About how to balancing this month, or not, or whatever that is. I mean, that all weighs heavily on your shoulders as well, but when you think about it, this is what I've been working for and this is what it's all about, and this is what success is, yeah.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah, yeah. Because your business is just so closely connected to your why.

Emma Woodcock:
Yes.

Alison Rentoul:
Greater human goal of trying to create equality, I guess. And re-address the balance there. Which your business is working every day to achieve that. And it's just so wonderful to know that, as a woman, you can wear a piece of jewellery that's not only beautiful, but that feels so beautiful knowing that it is helping another woman to create a beautiful life for herself.

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah, totally.

Alison Rentoul:
Such a fabulous, fabulous… It's almost like wearing a proud badge of honour to say, “Look, I'm helping somebody else”. Like, feel it yourself, you know.

Emma Woodcock:
One of the things I was drawn to doing something in the fashion industry, was to reach women. Because I know how bad I am at taking a compliment. Like, if someone says, oh I really love what you're wearing, or you really look nice, I kind of quickly brush it away or run to the next room, and I thought, hang on, we need to create a face to actually say that honestly, yeah, I do, but also knowing that there's a story behind it, it immediately means we can take that compliment on and then shift into the story of it, so we don't then get too uncomfortable. But then there is something we can talk about, about why they're complimenting that.

Alison Rentoul:
Yes.

Emma Woodcock:
I think just connect with who's behind what you’re… It gives you a greater sense of purpose and passion as well about what you're actually bringing into your home, and what you're actually putting on your body. I'm very aware of what we can put into our body, how we consume what's healthy for us. And that very, one of the fortunate blessings we have in Australia, but we're not so aware about what we're putting on us.

Alison Rentoul:
Yes, yes, I a hundred percent agree. I think it is slowly, slowly starting to change in Australia, but we are lagging behind, definitely Europe and other places, where they're becoming much much more conscious of the whole ethical fashion movement.

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah, I really see a cusp happening in Australia, and it's really exciting, I think, as the wave's building, it's good, it's good. I think Australia can be quite powerful so bring it on.

Alison Rentoul:
Oh. Yeah, I mean, once everybody does that, to shift their mindset towards that, and you know, we're such a lucky country, and we always refer to Australia as a lucky country, but it's so true. We're in such a power, such a position of power to be able to as consumers, conscious consumers, to really make a difference with our purchases. If we start to really think about where things come from and how they're made. We've got things like Emma Watson. The other Emma.

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah, the other Emma. Oh, I'd love to be up on that level.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah, I mean, she was on the cover of Vogue Australia recently, talking about ethical fashion. So it is starting to infiltrate isn't it, which is fantastic.

Emma Woodcock:
It is.

Alison Rentoul:
And I hope that that knock on effect is gonna translate into more sales for the Grace & Able.

Emma Woodcock:
And for you.

Alison Rentoul:
It would be nice to be able to grow and feel communities to be able to grow their passion processes organically, and comfortably. It's just wonderful.

Emma Woodcock:
Thank you.

Alison Rentoul:
So what's you, what's on the horizon for Grace & Able?

Emma Woodcock:
Okay, so we just launched a new collection, last Thursday, which is really exciting. So it's more deeper dual tones for winter. Just going into some of those comforting winter tones, really. So, beautiful, yeah, really beautiful. And I just enjoy the privilege of being able to work with colour so easily. And so that's just released now, so we're getting that into store and into our customer's hands. And it's so far been received really well. There's a couple of development projects happening overseas, but that could take a long time.

Like, it's just grass roots networking, that it does take a while to get things up and going, but we're looking at doing, like I mentioned, one in the Philippines, and also one in Bali. So there will be an expansion there. We're also, I'm also looking at bringing more homewares to Grace & Able and just exploring. My artisans are very skilled and there's a lot more they can do than just the jewellery, so we're just sort of working through that. What would that look like, how would that look, do they have the time, how can they expand to manage that. So yeah, those are the things that we're answering now to grow Grace & Able.

Alison Rentoul:
Oh, how exciting.

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah, it never stops.

Alison Rentoul:
No, it never stops. But I mean, such a rewarding journey, and just so wonderful to talk to another like-minded soul.

Emma Woodcock:
I know. It really helps because I think when you're running your business, I'm sure you get that for Aquamarine, at times it gets lonely, or you just get so up in your head, that you really need to know where your like-minded people are to go and have a conversation with them, just think yeah, I'm not so crazy.

Alison Rentoul:
No, and for the people watching it's quite nice, because Emma and I actually live just one suburb away from each other, so.

Emma Woodcock:
It is, but we don't see each other that often for doing that.

Alison Rentoul:
I know, we definitely need to catch up for another coffee again really soon.

Emma Woodcock:
That would be great, yeah. And all are welcome, anyone in Melbourne is welcome.

Alison Rentoul:
Yes, yeah that would be great. If anybody else is coming down this way, we're on the Mornington Peninsula.

Emma Woodcock:
That's right, that's right.

Alison Rentoul:
So everyone, I'm gonna put the links in the article, so you'll be able to see how to get to the Grace & Able website. If you are just wanting to purchase some beautiful jewellery for yourself, or a gift for a friend. And there are some nice homewares, some baskets and things like that there as well, that we don't actually stock in at Aquamarine, because they're not so coastal designed, they're more of a different sort of style, but you might love them. So you can go and have a look at those, and then of course, in our Aquamarine store, we've got a selection of some of the pieces that are just beautiful, coastal kind of colours.

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah, it's beautiful colours.

Alison Rentoul:
Yeah, so you can find those there as well. And make sure you sign up to the Grace & Able newsletter, because Emma always sends out lots of interesting articles as well, and things to mention about what she's been doing. You can follow her journey and find out more about what the beautiful artisans are doing. And all their new collection, and all that sort of thing as well.

Emma Woodcock:
Yeah, thank you, yeah, sign up.

Alison Rentoul:
Yes. So thank you so much Emma for joining us today. It's been really fantastic talking to you, and so wonderful to learn so much more about the origins of Grace & Able. And yeah, I'm looking forward to an exciting future, it's wonderful working with you.

Emma Woodcock:
Oh I love partnering with you, and thank you for creating this space and this time for all of us, but for me as well.

Alison Rentoul:
My pleasure. Thanks darling, have a lovely day.

Emma Woodcock:
You too, bye.

Alison Rentoul:
Bye.

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Visit Grace & Able's online store here, or browse their jewellery in our collection at Aquamarine Home here.

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How does Emma's story inspire you? What are your thoughts about the importance of sharing empowerment? We would love to hear your thoughts on this in the comments below!

 

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